Climate change: How the country is tackling one of the world’s biggest problems

While there might be some huge problems facing the world right now, there’s no doubt that the US government has targeted climate change as one of the biggest.

We don’t need to write about the perils of this topic – books, dissertations and everything else has been penned which highlights just how much damage climate change could cause to the environment for years to come.

Fortunately, the authorities are working endlessly. While some news headlines may portray the issue negatively, if one scrutinizes all of the plans in place it is clear that immense progress is being made.

Let’s take a look at several of the biggest ways in which the country is tackling climate change and easing the problems it is causing.

Data is absolutely key to the future

You may have been expecting to read about all of the initiatives that are in place, which have probably already affected you at some point over the last few years. Trust us, that will come later, but something that is often overlooked is the sheer amount of data that the authorities are attempting to collect in relation to emissions.

It doesn’t matter which industry you are involved in, data is key. Without it, there is absolutely no way to see where the problems lie and what, if any, progress is being made.

It’s one of the main reasons why NEON was created. Funded by the National Science Foundation and led by CEO Russ Lea, this collects data for all around the country about the effects of climate change. It was a $434m investment – highlighting the importance of data.

Science will always play a part

We’ve just touched on science, but really its worthy of its own section. Advancements in science is something that will aid climate change substantially and as is the case with the NEON project, it’s something that will always be invested in.

A lot of this investment comes in the form of research. The U.S. Global Change Research Program and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are just two examples. In short, if the authorities can find scientific solutions to efficiently improve climate change, it stands to reason that this investment is worthwhile.

Initiatives provide the biggest reductions

It would be fair to say that the previous two issues are almost working in the background – they are something that the average member of the public won’t be privy to.

Instead, most of us know about the initiatives that are in place. These are more likely to impact our day-to-day life and if we were to pick one example, the EPA vehicle greenhouse gas rules are particularly beneficial. This refers to the regulations that promote the production of clean vehicles – meaning that cars are suddenly becoming a lot more efficient. The fact that consumers should save around $1.7 trillion in fuel prices by 2025 highlights just how impressive these measures can be if implemented correctly.

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